Reviews?!...

Mad Slanted Powers

Jedi Commander
May 20, 2002
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I sort of felt the same way with Han's death as I did with Qui-Gon's. I suppose I should have seen Qui-Gon's death coming since we know Obi-Wan trained Anakin and that the Jedi would eventually be wiped out. But, in the course of the movie, it wasn't until Obi-Wan was separated from them in the final duel that I had a bad feeling about it. In TFA, once Han took off on that final mission, I thought he might die, but was still hoping he wouldn't. In ROTJ, when Luke was trying to get through to Vader early in the movie, I thought there might be hope for him to come over to the light. So, it was great when he finally did, but sad that he died as a result.
 

Darth Metalmute

Jedi Apprentice
Nov 26, 2001
1,857
0
Northwest Ohio
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I agree with Chux on this one. I felt cheated by Hans death. It was not an "Oh my God, Hans dead!" moment. I saw it coming as soon as soon Kylo Ren started to walk across the bridge. Even though the scene was supposed to be emotionally draining, it did not come off that way to me. I thought Harrison Ford pulled off his lines perfectly, but Adam Driver's Ben dialog failed me throughout the movie and was a major disappointment here. The entire time it felt like Ben was using a cheep trick on Han. Even though Ben is Hans son, I feel like Han Solo would have never fell for that trick.

Star Wars has played such a huge role in my life, that Han Solos death should have made me teary eyed or at least dropped my jaw. It did neither...
 

Tycho

Sith Knight
Aug 16, 2001
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San Diego, CA
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I disagree completely. The death of Han Solo has been the only major character death in any Star Wars film that has had any sort of emotional impact for me. Obviously your mileage may vary.
I agree. When Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan die, we barely knew them. Ewan logged more hours than Alec did as Obi Wan. But we grew up with Han Solo.
 

Mr. JabbaJohnL

Jedi Council Member
Nov 12, 2001
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I saw it for the second time and loved it even more. The first time, I was piecing together all the trailers, spoilers, and speculation, and processing HOLY CRAP THIS IS A NEW STAR WARS MOVIE. The second time, I was able to enjoy it more on its own merits, get more of the foreshadowing, and understand a few things I missed the first time. And yes, a lot of plot points are very similar to ANH, but the original moments stood out more to me this time and some issues I had faded into the background. It's a pretty damn good movie.

I saw it in IMAX 3D, and if you have the option, I highily recommend it. The space battles are more exciting and clear, and one of the coolest-looking shots was when Rey slides down the dune after scavenging. And the CGI characters (Maz, Unkar, Leia's mouth :D ) blended in more naturally.

As for Han's death, I saw it coming a mile away the first time. Between rumors, Harrison wanting him to die in ROTJ, and the fact that the mentor character always dies in the first movie of a trilogy, you'd be foolish to not expect it. The second time I was able to pay more attention to the setup and emotion, both in this scene and earlier ones. I thought it was very well done. I really get the saddest at Anakin's death, and I actually teared up while rewatching the films recently, but more because of his turn back to the light and his final words to Luke. So the "sad factor" is not really a thing for me with SW deaths. (Though I did actually also get pretty sad at the end of Dark Disciple...)
 

bigbarada

Jedi Apprentice
Aug 15, 2001
11,867
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Hillsboro, IL
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I agree. When Qui-Gon and Obi-Wan die, we barely knew them. Ewan logged more hours than Alec did as Obi Wan. But we grew up with Han Solo.
Seeing Han killed onscreen conjured up many of the same emotions that I felt when I first learned of Leonard Nimoy's death. Even though Harrison Ford is obviously still alive, watching a fictional character, that I've known by name since I was 5 years old, killed onscreen affected me far more than I anticipated.

This is actually the first time that any Star Wars film has had such a dramatic emotional impact on me; but part of that probably had to do with my lifelong interest in the character. So I understand that not everybody will share my reaction. To each his own.

It's the same reason that I can totally fall in love with a movie and then show it to my friends and they feel completely indifferent to it. It's not necessarily the fault of the movie, it's just that each person is different and different stories touch different people in different ways. There is nothing objective to it at all.
 

El Chuxter

Jedi Peacekeeper
Aug 16, 2001
20,450
25
Artemis Club
Watching it a second time, worrying less about plot similarities to ANH and not expecting Kylo Ren to be anything other than a douchey kid with a lightsaber, I enjoyed it much more. I'd even put it above ROTJ. And I'm not one of those ROTJ haters; it's a damn near perfect movie.

Kylo didn't bother me nearly as much this time, for some reason.
 

Tycho

Sith Knight
Aug 16, 2001
20,898
25
San Diego, CA
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BigBarada, we feel the same way. And regarding Leonard Nimoy, he was revered by me almost like Jesus or Mohammed are revered by others. He embodied Spock who spoke to me to always doubt theorize and test for proof instead of taking leaps of faith unless all other logical options were expired, and the needs of the many without way the needs of the few.

I've always been more passionate about Star Wars than Star Trek, but Vulcans are impressive!

Spock taught me how to rationally think and I hold him in higher regard than religious or political figures.

Han Solo just always represented skeptism being honored by emotional and sometimes patronizing sarcasm. But by an adaptive and resourceful individual who would never give up on themselves at the very least.

Chux, Kylo Ren was well-played by Adam exactly as he was written to be.
 

Lord Malakite

Jedi Council Member
Sep 30, 2001
3,346
19
37
Williamsburg, OH
Having seen the movie twice now I can say I did not care for it. Certainly not the worst movie I've ever seen, but overall it left me rather unimpressed. I'd put all six previous movies above it.
 

Bel-Cam Jos

Jedi Council Member
Aug 16, 2001
16,085
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Where 'text' & 'friend' are nouns
After my third (and likely last for some time :( ) viewing, I'd still put it at #7 of the seven. Still confusing (although less so now), still predictable plots and dialogue. I like it, but couldn't move it up the rankings.
 

JediTricks

Jedi Council Member
Aug 14, 2001
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Los Angeles, CA
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Saw it on Tuesday, theater has $6 Tuesdays for regular, and discounts on larger-format, 3D, and Dbox moving seats ( :rolleyes: ). It's "fine", not as bad as Abrams' Star Trek movies, not as insulting to the canon, likable new characters for the most part, but still plenty of script issues and a few glaring technical ones, it doesn't feel inspired by anything other than previous Star Wars films, and it has a twinge of being a Hollywood sequel to an anti-Hollywood series. My instinct was 6.5/10, maybe 7/10.

I will say that it didn't have much in the way that excited me either, mostly it was Poe's material being brash and flying the X-wing.
 

Bel-Cam Jos

Jedi Council Member
Aug 16, 2001
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After my fourth viewing, in IMAX 3-D, I would move TFA up to #5 (ahead of AOTC and TPM). I realized that Abrams created this film to cater to an audience who may never have been the focus of any film before: new, blind Star Wars fans. That is the only explanation for the obvious dialogue that explains what just occurred on-screen.