Vintage Photos

plasticfetish

Senator
May 2, 2002
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Portland, OR
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Exactly. Macro lets you look at things that are very close, and telephoto lets you look at things that are very far away.

Very nice Rebo's_Guitarist! Love the abstract qualities.
What kind of lighting are you using there?
 

plasticfetish

Senator
May 2, 2002
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Portland, OR
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So is it just a very wide angle lens? I always thought that wide angle lens would distort objects too much if they were close up.
I'm not great at explaining this sort of thing... but I've always just understood it as being a kind of lens that lets you focus on things that are much closer than a "normal" lens would. It magnifies the image, so that it's larger (1:1 or 2:1 and sometimes better) than it would be if you just used a telephoto lens. (There are also telephoto macro lenses though, that let you magnify something that's somewhat far away.)

I used my mini led mag for the blue shades, otherwise I used some can lights with energy efficient floresents.
Cool idea using an LED as a spot! I'll have to try that some time. :)
 

JediTricks

Jedi Council Member
Aug 14, 2001
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That has a very short focal length! Geez, I don't think I could use a lens that tight, my manual focusing skills aren't good enough and getting up that close I'd probably knock the subjects down. What lens/camera is it?
 

JediTricks

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Aug 14, 2001
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Ah, cool setup, that's a pretty decent prime lens there I gather, I can see it's got no distortion and good color. So, what shot speeds did you use there? (I'd check the exif data, but it's not there since it's been edited down to for-web use.) I don't have steady hands so any macro I take are very long tripod shots, I try to go over a quarter-second, but as rich as your shots are there, I could see you going over a few seconds.

I keep forgetting that Sony bought Konica/Minolta which is why those 2 went together.
 

bigbarada

Jedi Apprentice
Aug 15, 2001
11,867
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Hillsboro, IL
www.matt-hughes.com
I have a Canon Digital Rebel and this is the best I can do using the lens that came with the camera. It goes down to 18mm, but you can see some serious distortion especially when looking at the Chewbacca figure (and yes, I'm one of the five people who bought the Unleashed Bossk).
 

plasticfetish

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May 2, 2002
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Portland, OR
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Looks pretty good actually. Depth of field isn't what macro lenses are all about, so just about anything beyond the specific focal point will be blurry.

Playing around with the lighting you use is important also. More and brighter lights will give you sharper images, but it all depends on how sensitive your camera is.

...and for the record, I was one of the other five people that bought Bossk. :)
 

bigbarada

Jedi Apprentice
Aug 15, 2001
11,867
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Hillsboro, IL
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I guess I could fake the macro look by just cropping the photos down, here's that same photo at full size, but cropped down to fit within the attachment limitations of this forum. It's grainy, but that's just because I'm using a 1600 ISO (which is the only way I can get any decent photos when shooting indoors).

I probably should have cropped it down to the vintage Snowtrooper, since this is the vintage forums, but I just love that VTAC Snowtrooper.

I'm sure if I took the time to set up some real lights and got my camera set up on a tripod, I'd get cleaner results. This is just me using my desk lamp and bracing the camera against the desk.
 

plasticfetish

Senator
May 2, 2002
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Portland, OR
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You know... the nice thing about shooting photos for the internet, as opposed to something for print (a magazine, etc.), is that you don’t have to really freak out about resolution. If you have even a little room to set up some basic lighting, and have a camera that will shoot at a decent resolution, you can do very very well. (Photoshop helps when it comes to color correction and sharpening of coarse.)

I’ve always worked with the cheapest possible tools, trying to concentrate not so much on the gadgets, but on how I use them. (Limitations force you to think, and to be creative.) It’s good to buy one camera, and use it for as long as possible... you need to get to know that tool and what it can do... almost by instinct.

I’ve had some studio space to work with over the years, but nothing massive. My lighting consists of about four or five simple clamp lights with a variety of bright flood and spot bulbs. I’ve been using a really basic pocket camera as well (currently a Sony Cyber-shot), with some adjustable settings, but mostly I don’t worry about it. Enough light and the camera will do its job, and then the real work... just like in any photo lab... happens on the computer.

But there’s something to be said for playing around and experimenting. Rebo's_Guitarist’s idea about using an LED flashlight as a spot for macro shooting is really great. I would have never thought of that... very creative.
 

Rebo's_Guitarist

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Aug 23, 2004
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Duluth, MN
nlindstromphoto.com
I dont remember exactly what I used, but it was full Manual setting with my f/stops ranging from f/11 all the way to f/32 with the appropriate shutter speeds, the most being probably 12 seconds.

BigBarada: Most cameras will have a macro function already built into the camera. Its not as good as having a macro lens but it still does the trick. Ill post some examples when I switch to my other computer.

This functions designated symbol is a flower. The trick to using it is to not use your zoom at all, rather physically move the camera closer or farther. Not using a tripod (depending how close you are) will almost garuntee a blurry photo. Big time macro photographers have a special rail guide system that mounts to the tripod, so you can focus within millimeters.
 

Rebo's_Guitarist

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Aug 23, 2004
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Alright I took these two last summer.

1) Was taken with the same setup, Alpha100 w/ 50mm 2.8 Macro. This was my first macro attempt and turned out alright.

2) Was taken with a 4.0MP Kodak DX5960 (I think) advanced point and shoot using the macro (flower) function I mentioned above. I was suprised I was able to get that close.

My first camera, which was ~$300, took comparable pics to my Alpha100 which was a lot more money.

Also chaning your white balance will change your lights color. Thats how I got the LED to come out so blue.

Depth of field can be adjusted by lessening your aperature (raising the f/stop number) and increasing your shutter speed. I want to say that on that Vader I had an aperature as small as I could, f/32 - letteing the least amount of light in, and about a 10 second exposure - letting every detail to soak in as the appropriate amount of light was slowly let through.
 

bigbarada

Jedi Apprentice
Aug 15, 2001
11,867
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Hillsboro, IL
www.matt-hughes.com
That's awesome stuff. So exactly what setup are you using for those and what's the aperture, shudder speed, etc.?

Like I mentioned before, I took one photography class back in 2003, but have been spending the last couple of years learning as much as I can in a "trial by fire" kind of environment. Working for Matt Hughes, I'm his unofficial photographer so I get to document all of his training and I also do pretty much all of the product photos for our store.

So it's been a lot of trial and error for me. I attached one of the t-shirt photos that I took for our store and a catalog (we get Matt's twin brother, Mark, to pose for the photos). This is one of the better ones, but now that winter is here, by the time Mark gets off of work the sun is already almost down. So I'm trying to figure out how to get "cheerful" indoor photos that will make people want to buy the item.

The other two are pics that I took while Matt was training and you can see the motion blur that I just can't seem to get rid of. What would I need to get clean, freeze-frame action under indoor lighting?
 

Rebo's_Guitarist

Jedi Initiate
Aug 23, 2004
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Duluth, MN
nlindstromphoto.com
More light.

You could always try the action feature. It is usually designated by a guy running. Or if the background isnt important you could set it to the Aperature setting and open the shutter up as far as it will go (lowest possible number) and the shutter speed will coordinate automatically. This will allow you to shoot at the fastest possible speed making them less blurry, given there is enough light. This is also a good time to use your burst mode. 1 out of 12 has to turn out, right?:thumbsup:

Hot shoe flashes are nice, but I dont have one yet.

I havent taken any classes so everything I have learned was from trial and error, or from books / online tutorials. There is a lot of helpful info out there. Helpful people as well.
 

bigbarada

Jedi Apprentice
Aug 15, 2001
11,867
5
Hillsboro, IL
www.matt-hughes.com
More light.

You could always try the action feature. It is usually designated by a guy running. Or if the background isnt important you could set it to the Aperature setting and open the shutter up as far as it will go (lowest possible number) and the shutter speed will coordinate automatically. This will allow you to shoot at the fastest possible speed making them less blurry, given there is enough light. This is also a good time to use your burst mode. 1 out of 12 has to turn out, right?:thumbsup:

Hot shoe flashes are nice, but I dont have one yet.

I havent taken any classes so everything I have learned was from trial and error, or from books / online tutorials. There is a lot of helpful info out there. Helpful people as well.
I try to use only the Manual setting on my camera, but the aperture will only open up to 4.0 and only then if the sensor detects enough light (otherwise it will reset it to 5.0 or 5.6 automatically). I'm not sure if that's a limitation of the camera or just me not knowing how to override the default settings.